Photojournalism Can Be Macro /or/ Micro

We typically think of photojournalism as large-scale stuff. Epic adventures across world wars and revolutions in far away lands. Wildlife adventures, or that history concert of the century, photojournalism is an excellent vehicle for storytelling at scale. 

And photojournalism stories aren’t restricted to singular events either. A dazzling photo book, Vienna Portrait of a City, takes a 175 year journey of epic events and cultivation of culture throughout the historic growth of Vienna Austria. Monumental historical events and the formation of new art forms are artfully presented in this picturesque storybook. It really illustrates the power of photojournalism itself; sitting back in that comfy chair at home you are magically transported through Viennese history by the immersive photography. As all good photojournalism does, you may even be compelled to book your next holiday with a trip to Vienna to take in all this artistic splendor for yourself. Bring the book with you of course, to get a deep sense for the dramatic transformation of Vienna over the past two centuries.

But grandiose settings spanning over momentous history and exciting sporting events driving into overtime are not the only potential for good photojournalism. Microcosms that may often get overlooked by most of us can be fascinating subjects for others with unique insights. Like that plane ride across the ocean to Vienna, seems quite ordinary in today’s post jet set world. But but an airline pilot with extraordinary insight into the technology and beauty of the iconic 747 airliner sees much more to it. In his book “How to Land a Plane“, expert pilot and now author Mark Vanhoenacker takes us on an image filled experience of flight where we can practically feel the engine controls at our own fingertips as the jet launches down the runway. Now Mr. Vanhoenacker himself says:

You cannot learn to land a plane by reading a book, but hopefully it’s a fun way of thinking about what pilots think about all the time.

Mark Vanhoenacker

Yet for a moment there we sure do feel like we are flying …

That’s the power of photojournalism, and it works at any scale. What really brings the story home is the personal insight and passion of us as storytellers ourselves. And a little empathy can go a long way. Almost all of us have written on an airplane at one time or another, telling the story from the storytellers point of view with that understanding of what it’s like on the other side of the partition resonates with us. The rich imagery natural for photojournalism like those epic shots of Viennese cityscape will make us feel like we were there, and stay with us for decades. 

We here at MX-Fusion are passionate for the power and emotion of photographs! Fusing a photo story with music can create an immersive emotional storytelling experience. Unique, and even esoteric locations broaden our worldview with rich imagery that inspires out imagination as if we had lived it ourselves.

What’s your story? Is it your own hometown, or that globe-trotting sabbatical you are just getting back from? Expansive or cozy, your experiences are truly your own story to tell; with photojournalism you can share to the world and really make an impact. 

While we ponder great stories big and small, let’s enjoy a Fusion for Rokít | I Just Wanna Fly:

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